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Teaching and Learning in College: A Resource for Educators

Tomorrow's Teaching and Learning

Message Number: 
522

Teaching and Learning as a Transactional Process enumerates severalwell-thought out strategies to reflect upon one's own teaching style.The "guided self-inquiry inventory" encourages introspection and encourages the reader not only to question one's own teaching style but also to stimulate inquiry into students' learning styles, perceptions of power and authority, and barriers to success.

Folks:

The posting below is a review of the book, Teaching and Learning in College: A Resource for Educators by Gary S. Wheeler, editor (2002); Info-Tec, Elyria, OH; 199 pages; It is from the July 2003 AAHEBulletin.com. The reviewer is Christopher Scott, assistant professor and director, physical therapist assistant program, Washington State Community College, Ohio, and doctoral student, higher education program, Ohio University; cscott@wscc.edu. Copyright ? 2003 - American Association for Higher Education. The American Association for Higher Education is a "shared mission partner" of the Tomorrow's Professor Mailing List. http://www.AAHEBulletin.com Copyright ?200X American Association for Higher Education. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Reprinted with permission.

Regards,

Rick Reis

reis@stanford.edu

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Tomorrow's Teaching and Learning

 

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TEACHING AND LEARNING: A COLLEGE RESOURCE FOR EDUCATORS

 

New collegiate instructors are often ill-prepared for the transition from professional or student to academician. This book provides several examples, including a valuable case study and a section on strategies that can be used as a means for self-analysis.

Teaching and Learning in College provides six chapters of diverse yet related materials, including chapters related to the demographics of various higher education settings and one on diversity issues. Further, the insightful chapter on assessment provides good examples of both formative and summative assessment tools, along with strategies to implement and reflect upon the effectiveness of each tool.

Another chapter offers ideas for setting up learning communities for faculty as well as for students. The chapter gives suggestions for implementing faculty development centers with several examples from successful institutions.

The chapter on teaching dialogues provides a case study centered on a faculty member who truly wants to improve his teaching and further utilize the available technology. The chapter effectively illuminates the pitfalls of implementation without thorough planning and provides suggestions at the end of the case to help avoid those pitfalls.

Teaching and Learning as a Transactional Process enumerates several well-thought out strategies to reflect upon one's own teaching style. The "guided self-inquiry inventory" encourages introspection and encourages the reader not only to question one's own teaching style but also to stimulate inquiry into students' learning styles, perceptions of power and authority, and barriers to success.

Overall, the book is a good resource for new faculty members. Although the chapters that provide historical and demographic information are a more cumbersome read, the book generally flows well. The reader can come away with some immediate ideas for self-assessment and strategies to implement these newly determined goals.